Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln’s Stories and Humor

When Ohio Congressman James Ashley disapproved of a story Abraham Lincoln had just told, the President responded: “Ashley, I have great confidence in you and great respect for you, and I know how sincere you are. But if I couldn’t tell these stories, I would die.” On…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Military Initiatives

Historian John Hope Franklin wrote that as President Lincoln “evolved his plan of emancipation, he was viewed all the more unfavorably because he felt it necessary to restrain enthusiastic officers who…”

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Jacob Collamer (1791-1865)

Collamer took a leading role in the effort of Senate Republicans to change the Cabinet in mid-December 1862. As Maine Senator William Fessenden later recalled, Collamer’s involvement in the Senate caucus that sought…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

September 2, 1864 Historian Robert S. Harper wrote in Lincoln and the Press that New York Tribune Editor Horace “Greeley still was unconvinced and continued to press the movement for a substitute Republican candidate for President. He headed a committee of three that wrote letters to the ‘loyal governors’ to learn [...]...Read More
Tue, Sep 02, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Thomas J. Pickett (1821-1891)

Thomas J. Pickett, born in Kentucky, founded more than a dozen newspapers in three states. Pickett moved to Illinois where he became editor of several newspapers in northwest…

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

The Speech

Historian Benjamin Thomas wrote: “All day on February 27, 1860 Lincoln was entertained at the Astor House as a visiting celebrity. That night, despite a snowstorm, fifteen hundred persons filed into Cooper Union, the largest assemblage…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Salmon P. Chase

Salmon P. Chase was “dignified, able and ambitious, likewise he is the special antipathy of the New York Herald, and the mirror of perfection for the New York Times, whose Washington staff of correspondents are the favorites of Mr. Chase,” wrote journalist Noah Brooks. “Mr. Chase …

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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