Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln’s Faith

In December 1864, President Abraham Lincoln wrote out a story for his friend, journalist Noah Brooks. It was entitled: The President’s Last, Shortest and Best Speech. It read: “On Thursday of last week two ladies from Tennessee came before the President…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

1856

In 1854, Mr. Lincoln avoided meeting with the organizers of the new Republican Party. In 1856, Mr. Lincoln was maneuvered into taking a leadership role by his law partner, William H. Herndon. Herndon wrote in his biography of Mr. Lincoln: “Finding himself drifting about with the disorganized elements that floated together after the angry political waters had subsided, it …

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Emilie (Emily) Todd Helm

Half-sister of Mary Todd Lincoln, Emilie (Emily) Todd Helm first came to the White House in December 1863, accompanied by her daughter Katherine. In March 1861, President Lincoln had offered her husband, Ben Hardin Helm, the job of army paymaster, which he declined. He instead became a confederate…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

October 25, 1864 Lincoln’s old Illinois friend Mark Delahay writes: “Kansas safe, [Confederate General Sterling] Price retreating South on the Kansas line, Pleasonton, Blunt & others in pursuit; our Malitia returning to their homes; we have been all playing soldier for the last Ten days — last night several Regiments passed [...]...Read More
Sat, Oct 25, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

T. Lyle Dickey (1811-1885)

Illinois Republican William Pitt Kellogg recalled: “During the canvass of 1860 I met, at Pekin, Judge T. Lyle Dickey, a prominent Democratic lawyer and judge. He related to me that…

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Moses F. Odell (1818-1866)

Brooklyn Congressman Moses F. Odell’s service in Washington coincided with the Civil War. He had the distinction of being the token Democratic House member of Joint Committee on Conduct of War. “Although Odell did not always agree with…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and William H. Herndon

William H. Herndon: “was about five feet nine inches in height and well proportioned; his movements were swift; he was a rapid thinker, writer and speaker, and usually reached his conclusions quickly and expressed them forcibly and positively,” wrote Charles Zane, who became Herndon’s law partner…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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