Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln and Literature

Shakespeare can be a politician’s best friend. He certainly was Abraham Lincoln’s favorite author. In an 1860 biography of candidate Lincoln, journalist William Dean Howells wrote that Mr. Lincoln was “a diligent student of Shakespeare, to know whom…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Domestic Reaction

Lincoln Biographer Isaac N. Arnold, “Before the sun went down on the memorable 22d of September, the contents of this edict had been flashed by the telegraph to every part of the republic. By a large majority of the loyal people…”

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Notable Visitors

Among the visitors to the White House were many politicians and office-seekers. Although Mr. Lincoln seldom read the newspapers, some of the regular visitors were journalists. Some of them were family friends—like Noah Brooks. Some were also prominent Republican leaders…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

July 29, 1864 President Lincoln telegraphs Ulysses S. Grant: “I have changed my purpose, so that now I expect to reach Fort-Monroe at 10. A.M. Sunday, the 31st.” President Lincoln writes Anne Williamson in Scotland: “The plaid you send me is just now placed in my hands. I thank you for that [...]...Read More
Tue, Jul 29, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

James H. Matheny (1818-1890)

On the morning of his wedding on November 4, 1842, Mr. Lincoln woke up James Matheny, told him he was getting married that night, and asked him to be his best man. At the home of Ninian Edwards later that day…

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Preston King (1806-1865)

Navy Secretary Gideon Welles, not one to compliment others, called Senator Preston King “a man of wonderful sagacity; has an excellent mind and judgment. Our views correspond on most questions.”1 Nearly a year after King had left the Senate in 1863, …

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and The Radicals

As a group, the Republican Radicals in Congress lacked the sense of a humor that Abraham Lincoln had in abundance. Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner was especially humorless and obstinate. Wisconsin Republican Carl Schurz observed that “Mr. Lincoln was a constant …

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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