Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics

Lincoln Speaks

Lincoln Speaks: Words That Transformed a Nation, an exhibition co-organized by the Morgan Library & Museum and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, was on display at the Morgan Library & Museum, January 23 through June 7, 2015. A complete online version of the exhibition, along with supplemental materials, is available right here on abrahamlincoln.org. More than eighty items from his remarkable life--speeches, letters, legal writings, personal notes, and more--are included in the exhibition.

Read reviews on Lincoln Speaks in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address

As President-elect Abraham Lincoln traveled from Springfield to Washington in February 1860, he deliberately avoided making policy statements that might be misinterpreted in either North or South. Historian Daniel J. Ryan noted that “Lincoln of course,…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Mr. Lincoln wrote to Senator Douglas on July 24, 1858: “Will it be agreeable to you to make an arrangement for you and myself to divide time, and address the same audience during the present canvass? Mr. [Norman B.] Judd, who will hand you this, is authorized to…”

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Thomas T. Eckert (1825-1910)

Thomas T. Eckert was an Army major, telegraph superintendent of the War Department and trusted emissary of the President. President Lincoln prevented Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton from firing Eckert in early 1862. Before Stanton…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

November 30, 1864 Attorney General Edward Bates writes: “I resigned my office of Atty Genl. [of the] U.S. to take effect No 30, 1864, having served just 3 years and 3/4. Some months before[,] I made known to the President my wish to retire as soon as he should be reelected [...]...Read More
Sun, Nov 30, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Mr. Lincoln and Friends

Journalist Brooks, who knew Mr. Lincoln in both Illinois and Washington, observed: “It was noticeable that Mr. Lincoln’s keenest critics and bitter opponents studiously avoided his presence; it seemed as though no man could…”

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Roscoe Conkling (1829-1888)

Conkling was better known for his career after the Civil War — when his arrogance reached almost insufferable levels. After serving another term in Congress from 1865 to 1867, Conkling was elected to the Senate. “Conkling was a…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Women

Lincoln’s relationships with women were unsure and uneven – especially in his youth. He had not been schooled in social graces so he was not sometimes artless in his conversation with women. His move in 1831 to New Salem, a small Illinois settlement, was his first…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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