Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln’s Beautiful Face By Richard J. Behn

We remember his grave face in granite and marble. Friends remembered Abraham Lincoln’s face differently. His “expression in repose was sad and dull; but his ever-recurring humor, at short intervals, flashed forth with the brilliancy of an electric…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

1848 Campaign

Before the end of the 1847-1848 congressional session, Mr. Lincoln commented on the upcoming presidential contest and slavery on the House floor. “Our democratic friends seem to be in great distress because they think our candidate for the President don’t suit us. Most of them can not find out that Gen: Taylor has any principles at all; some, however, have …

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Cordelia A. P. Harvey (1824-1898)

Cordelia A. P. Harvey was a one-time school teacher and the widow of Wisconsin Governor Louis P. Harvey. He died in 1862 – two months into his gubernatorial term when he slipped when crossing between two boats and drowned in the…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

September 16, 1864 The presidential campaign continues to heat up. Attorney General Edward Bates writes in his diary: “To day, I handed to Mr. Nicolay my check for $250, my contribution to the National Union Comme., toward the pending election. I believe all the other cabinet ministers have done the [...]...Read More
Tue, Sep 16, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Carl Schurz (1829-1906)

Schurz’s political influence was important to President Lincoln. Historian Hans L. Trefousse wrote that “there can be no question about Schurz’s effective advocacy of emancipation after the…”

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

After the Speech

It was a snowy, cold night outside when Mr. Lincoln spoke at Cooper Union. But inside the lecture hall, the response was warm. Historian Benjamin Thomas wrote: “as the intense figure on the rostrum uttered [the] stirring peroration, men and women…

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Alexander H. Stephens

In June 1863, Alexander H. Stephens urged Jefferson Davis to open negotiations with the Union government regarding the exchange of military prisoners: ‘I think I might do some good – not only on the immediate subject in hand,” wrote the Confederacy’s vice president…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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