Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln and the Law

Abraham Lincoln was a pragmatist in the use of power. Winston Churchill wrote that Lincoln was “anxious to keep the ship on an even keel and steer a steady course, he may lean all his weight now on one side and now on the other. His arguments in each case…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Preparation for Draft Proclamation

Between March and July of 1862, President Lincoln advocated compensated emancipation of slaves living in Border States. He also endorsed foreign colonization of freed slaves. But by July 1862, the Union war efforts in Virginia were going badly…

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Family Library

The family sitting room and library in the center of the South side of the second floor was the center of Mrs. Lincoln’s life at the White House. But President Lincoln did not get there as much as Mrs. Lincoln would have liked. Shortly after the 1864 elections, Mrs. Lincoln wrote a friend: “I consider myself fortunate, if at eleven…”

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

November 21, 1864 President Lincoln writes a Massachusetts veteran of the Revolutionary War, 105-year-old John Phillips, who had voted for President Lincoln’s reelection: “I have heard of the incident at the polls in your town, in which you bore so honored a part, and I take the liberty of writing [...]...Read More
Fri, Nov 21, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Jack Armstrong (1804-1854)

“I suppose you have heard of Lincoln’s wrestling match with Jack Armstrong. I saw part of that. [Jack] Armstrong was one of the Clary Grove gang and it was their habit to initiate newcomers into town. Lincoln was…”

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Moses F. Odell (1818-1866)

Brooklyn Congressman Moses F. Odell’s service in Washington coincided with the Civil War. He had the distinction of being the token Democratic House member of Joint Committee on Conduct of War. “Although Odell did not always agree with…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant

General Ulysses S. Grant came to the attention of President Lincoln and the nation when in February 1862 Grant captured two Confederate garrisons on the Tennessee River, Fort Henry and Fort Donelson. “U. S.” Grant got the nickname “Unconditional Surrender” Grant after…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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