Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address

As President-elect Abraham Lincoln traveled from Springfield to Washington in February 1860, he deliberately avoided making policy statements that might be misinterpreted in either North or South. Historian Daniel J. Ryan noted that “Lincoln of course,…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Martin Delany

Dr. Martin Delany was the highest ranking black commissioned officer in the Civil War — but the road to that distinction was a long one. “As early as October, 1861, Dr. Delany, when en route to Chicago, stopped at Adrian, Michigan, for the purpose of seeing President Mahan, of the Michigan College. The subject…

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

George W. Julian (1817-1899)

Galusha George W. Julian, Congressman from Indiana (Free Soil, 1849-51 and Republican, 1861-71), was the leading House member of Committee on the Conduct of the War. Although he differed with the President on the speed of his…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

November 28, 1864 Former New York Mayor George Opdyke writes President Lincoln: “A public meeting of citizens will be held at Cooper Institute on Thursday Evening next, the 3rd December, in response to your call on the Nation for additional volunteers. We beg leave, on behalf of the Committee of [...]...Read More
Fri, Nov 28, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Norman B. Judd (1815-1878)

“A great deal of fault was found at the time by the Whig press with Palmer, Cook and myself about our stand in the election of Trumbull in 1854,” Norman Judd said after President Lincoln’s murder. “But Lincoln…”

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

August Belmont (1816-1890)

Belmont was “sensitive to the ferment around him, but generally speaking what concerned him were the practical effects of disunion, not the moral and humanitarian aspects of human slavery. As a consequence, Belmont…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Black Soldiers

One of the first Union casualties of the Civil War in April 1861 was a black militiaman from Pennsylvania, Nicholas Biddle. Another early black casualty was George Keckley, son of Elizabeth Keckley, the emancipated black dressmaker to Mary Todd Lincoln. Prior to the…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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