Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln and the Bible

When Abraham Lincoln visited his friend Joshua Speed in Kentucky in the summer of 1841, Speed’s mother gave him an Oxford Bible. When Mr. Lincoln returned to the judicial circuit that fall, he wrote Speed’s sister back in Kentucky: “Tell your mother that…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Congressional Debate

President Lincoln took an active role in recruiting congressional supporters for passage of the Thirteenth Amendment in January 1865. Historian Allen C. Guelzo wrote: “This time, the Radicals could scarcely oppose…”

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

David Dixon Porter (1813-1891)

David Dixon Porter was a Union Navy admiral and son of War of 1812 naval hero David Porter. At the beginning of the war, Porter’s loyalty was questioned, given his close association with southerners like Jefferson Davis. Porter himself said he was headed to…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

July 22, 1864 President Lincoln briefs the Cabinet on the complicated negotiations undertaken by Tribune Editor Horace Greeley. Navy Secretary Gideon Welles writes in his diary: “At the Cabinet-meeting the President read his correspondence with Horace Greeley on the subject of peace propositions from George Saunders and other at Niagara Falls. [...]...Read More
Tue, Jul 22, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

James C. Conkling (1816-1899)

James C. Conkling wrote of the conclusion of the Illinois Legislative social season in early 1841 that Mr. Lincoln, “poor hapless simple swain who loved most true but was not loved again – I suppose he will now…”

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Moses F. Odell (1818-1866)

Brooklyn Congressman Moses F. Odell’s service in Washington coincided with the Civil War. He had the distinction of being the token Democratic House member of Joint Committee on Conduct of War. “Although Odell did not always agree with…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and William H. Herndon

William H. Herndon: “was about five feet nine inches in height and well proportioned; his movements were swift; he was a rapid thinker, writer and speaker, and usually reached his conclusions quickly and expressed them forcibly and positively,” wrote Charles Zane, who became Herndon’s law partner…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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