Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics

Lincoln Speaks

Lincoln Speaks: Words That Transformed a Nation, an exhibition co-organized by the Morgan Library & Museum and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, was on display at the Morgan Library & Museum, January 23 through June 7, 2015. A complete online version of the exhibition, along with supplemental materials, is available right here on abrahamlincoln.org. More than eighty items from his remarkable life--speeches, letters, legal writings, personal notes, and more--are included in the exhibition.

Read reviews on Lincoln Speaks in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

President Lincoln’s Moods

“Lincoln was a curious – mysterious – quite an incomprehensible man,” wrote William H. Herndon shortly before he died. As Lincoln’s longtime law partner and longtime wannabe biographer, Herndon knew whereof he spoke. In this book writer Joshua Wolf Shenk uses …

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Ottawa, August 21, 1858

Contemporary biographer Isaac Arnold wrote: “Just before the first joint discussion, which was to take place at Ottawa, there was a large gathering at the Chenery House, then the leading hotel in Springfield. The house was filled with…”

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Second Inaugural

Mr. Lincoln’s Second Inauguration on March 4, 1865 was drizzling at first, but a burst of sun during his oath of office was interpreted by Mr. Lincoln as a good omen. Lincoln aide John Nicolay later wrote in a letter to his fiancée: “The ceremonies passed off yesterday in as…”

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

November 30, 1864 Attorney General Edward Bates writes: “I resigned my office of Atty Genl. [of the] U.S. to take effect No 30, 1864, having served just 3 years and 3/4. Some months before[,] I made known to the President my wish to retire as soon as he should be reelected [...]...Read More
Sun, Nov 30, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

William A. Jayne (1826-1916)

Historian Vincent G. Tegeder wrote that Jayne“readily pleased the Radicals by calling for the passage of an antislavery law and a memorial for a…”

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Horace Greeley (1811-1872)

Nineteenth century journalist John Russell Young wrote: “Horace Greeley was a leader. To him journalism was not merely a vocation, an honorable means of earning daily bread, but a profession…The selling of news and narrative and literary criticisms, the imparting of precious truths upon…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Salmon P. Chase

Salmon P. Chase was “dignified, able and ambitious, likewise he is the special antipathy of the New York Herald, and the mirror of perfection for the New York Times, whose Washington staff of correspondents are the favorites of Mr. Chase,” wrote journalist Noah Brooks. “Mr. Chase …

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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