Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Speech

“There was a fall of rain with hail on the 4th of March, 1865, recalled journalist L.A. Gobright. An hour before noon, the inaugural procession left from the War Department for the Capitol without a key participant. According to Gobright, “Mr. Lincoln did not occupy…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Congressional Action and Inaction

From the beginning of the Civil War, President Lincoln came under considerable pressure from Radical Republicans to take action to free slaves in areas in rebellion against the Federal government. Mr. Lincoln doubted the…

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Kate Chase Sprague (1840-1899)

Daughter of Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, Kate Chase Sprague married Rhode Island Senator William Sprague during the Civil War. She was beautiful, charming, precocious, a leading social figure in…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

October 31, 1864 President Lincoln President Lincoln declares: Whereas the Congress of the United States passed an Act which was approved on the 21st. day of March, last, entitled, “An Act to enable the people of Nevada to form a Constitution and State Government, and for the admission of such [...]...Read More
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Gustave P. Koerner (1809-1896)

Koerner’s acquaintance with Mary Todd Lincoln predated that with Mr. Lincoln. The refugee from Germany had met Mary Todd when he was a student at Transylvania University in Lexington; he had already…

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Fernando Wood (1812-1881)

It was in New York City, rather than Washington, where Wood made his mark. Although he was no longer Mayor when Draft riots broke out in July 1863, some historians have suggested that the riots reaped seeds that Wood had…

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Edwin Stanton

War Department official Aide Charles Dana wrote that Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton was “impulsive, warm-blooded, very quick in execution, perhaps not always infallible in judgment. I never knew a man who could do so much work in a given time. He was a nervous…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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