Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics

Lincoln Speaks

Lincoln Speaks: Words That Transformed a Nation, an exhibition co-organized by the Morgan Library & Museum and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, will be on display at the Morgan Library & Museum, January 23 through June 7, 2015. More than eighty items from his remarkable life--speeches, letters, legal writings, personal notes, and more--will be on view. Read reviews on Lincoln Speaks in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.

A complete online version of the exhibition, along with supplemental materials, is available right here on abrahamlincoln.org.


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Lincoln’s Cooper Union Address

The stakes were high for Abraham Lincoln’s first political speech in New York City – and the first one in the East since he had left Congress more than a decade before. He had a reputation in the East for his seven Lincoln-Douglas debates but…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Louisiana and Black Suffrage

The right to vote was eventually guaranteed in the Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution. But it was not a right that most Americans recognized before or during the Civil War. The question of suffrage for…

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Lesson 1: The Emancipation Proclamation

President Lincoln’s original plan upon entering the Civil War in 1861 was to preserve the Union. The abolition of slavery, in his mind, was a secondary issue. Mr. Lincoln favored the gradual emancipation of slaves with compensation for owners, but he feared the racial consequences of…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

November 30, 1864 Attorney General Edward Bates writes: “I resigned my office of Atty Genl. [of the] U.S. to take effect No 30, 1864, having served just 3 years and 3/4. Some months before[,] I made known to the President my wish to retire as soon as he should be reelected [...]...Read More
Sun, Nov 30, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

William A. Richardson (1811-1875)

Richardson first met Lincoln during the Black Hawk War of 1832. They served together in the Illinois State House of Representatives in the mid-1830s. Richardson remained a Lincoln political opponent for…

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Daniel S. Dickinson (1807-1866)

Dickinson was indeed an orator who could change minds. Historian Sidney David Brummer noted that at the 1859 Democratic State Convention, “Dickinson had made a speech utterly re-probating the tactics of [New York City Mozart Hall leader Fernando] Wood and thus influenced many of the…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Women

Lincoln’s relationships with women were unsure and uneven – especially in his youth. He had not been schooled in social graces so he was not sometimes artless in his conversation with women. His move in 1831 to New Salem, a small Illinois settlement, was his first…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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