Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln’s Stories and Humor

When Ohio Congressman James Ashley disapproved of a story Abraham Lincoln had just told, the President responded: “Ashley, I have great confidence in you and great respect for you, and I know how sincere you are. But if I couldn’t tell these stories, I would die.” On…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

The Chicago Ministers

In early September, the pressure built. New Yorkers had been trekking to Washington all summer. In desperation, they even recruited New York Evening Post William Cullen Bryant. A delegation headed by the son of Alexander Hamilton came away frustrated…

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Peter H. Watson (? -1855)

Lawyer in partnership with Edwin M. Stanton who in 1862 joined the War Department as an assistant secretary shortly after Stanton was named secretary of war. Watson’s presence in the War Department diminished the…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

November 30, 1864 Attorney General Edward Bates writes: “I resigned my office of Atty Genl. [of the] U.S. to take effect No 30, 1864, having served just 3 years and 3/4. Some months before[,] I made known to the President my wish to retire as soon as he should be reelected [...]...Read More
Sun, Nov 30, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
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Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Mrs. Eliza Caldwell Browning

Mr. Lincoln had a clear comfort level with Eliza Browning that dated back to 1836 She played a special place in Mr. Lincoln’s early adulthood – as a representative of a higher social class with whom he could…

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

The Funeral Train

The grieving in New York City for President Lincoln began immediately on the day of his death, April 15, 1865. Crepe sprung from windows all across the city. Citizens gathered on Wall and Broad Streets in downtown. There was…

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln and Women

Lincoln’s relationships with women were unsure and uneven – especially in his youth. He had not been schooled in social graces so he was not sometimes artless in his conversation with women. His move in 1831 to New Salem, a small Illinois settlement, was his first…

Featured Article

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They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

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