Abraham Lincoln Institute Abraham Lincolns Life Lincoln Politics


Abraham Lincoln In Depth

Abraham Lincoln In Depth

John J. Crittenden (1787-1863)

After Clay’s death in 1852, Crittenden took over Clay’s role an the chief old-line Whig advocate of compromise between the North and South. Historian Douglas R. Egerton noted that Crittenden was the leading candidate in the…

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

Abraham Lincoln & Freedom

House Divided Speech

“Douglas is working like a lion. He is stumping the state, everywhere present and everywhere appealing to his old lieges to stand by him. Never did feudal baron fight more desperately against the common superior of himself and his retainers.” So reported Chester P. Dewey of the New York Evening Post on the…

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Abraham Lincoln's White House

Ward Hill Lamon (1828-1893)

Marshal for the city of Washington and chief of protocol at White House events, Ward Hill Lamon and Lincoln had a working law partnership before Lamon became prosecuting attorney in 1856. He was with President-elect Lincoln when he snuck into Washington in February 1861 to avoid possible violence in…

DAILY ABRAHAM LINCOLN BLOG

August 29, 1864 Navy Secretary Gideon Welles writes in his diary: “We have word through Rebel channels that the Union forces have possession of Fort Morgan. This will give us entire control of the Bay of Mobile.” The President sent me a bundle of papers, embracing a petition drawn up with great [...]...Read More
Fri, Aug 29, 2014
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
blog-square

Abraham Lincoln:
The Impact on the War, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
The proclamation, Part A

Abraham Lincoln:
New Years Day Reception

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

Abraham Lincoln & Friends

John Todd Stuart (1807-1885)

Mr. Lincoln lost his first legislative race shortly after the conclusion of the Black Hawk War in 1832 – but Stuart was elected. In 1834, Mr. Lincoln was approached by Democrats who sought to…

Abraham Lincoln & New York

Abraham Lincoln & New York

New York Democrats

President Lincoln told a visiting Democratic politician from New York: “I have heard some things from New York and if they are true, one might well say to your party there, as a drunken fellow once said when he heard the reading of an indictment for…”

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Lincoln's Contemporaries

Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas and Their Friend John Calhoun

Illinois – a large state with a small population in the 1830s – produced an unusual collection of men (they were virtually all men) who shaped the future of the country. Abraham Lincoln was one. Stephen A. Douglas was another. Their mutual friend and colleague, John Calhoun, was…

Featured Article

by

They were big men. George Washington was 6-foot-3. Abraham Lincoln was almost 6-4. Their ambitions were equally big — first for themselves, and then for the nation they would lead.

As young men, both future presidents trained as surveyors at periods when Americans were preoccupied by the development of the frontier and the acquisition of land. Historian John Ferling wrote: “Starting around age fifteen, George learned surveying through self-help books, such as `The Young Man’s Companion,’ and it is probable that he was tutored by some of the surveyors employed by the Fairfaxes.” In his search for self-improvement, 16-year-old Washington famously wrote out the rules for life and behavior from “Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” That pursuit would continue the rest of his life.

Surveying helped define both men. In 1834 Abraham Lincoln was named as a deputy surveyor of Sangamon County in Illinois; George Washington had been appointed as Culpepper County surveyor in 1749. Ferling observed that, “surveying … was a respectable and often lucrative occupation in Washington’s Virginia, as the population was growing and new frontiers were opening steadily.”

READ MORE